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PharmD Professional Electives Course List (SoP)

View the PharmD Professional Electives Policy


Note: Course offerings are subject to change. Please consult the Schedule of Classes in MyUW to confirm availability when you are planning your schedule. Not all courses below are offered every semester/year. Click on course title link in grid below to view course description. Course descriptions are separated into fall and spring semesters.


Course NumberCourse TitleCreditsPrerequisitesSemester OfferedLimit
Pharmaceutical Sciences (718)
Fall
625Toxicology I3Biochemistry, Physiology 335Fall60
699Independent Study1-3Consent of instructorFall & SpringUnlimited
Spring
430Biological Interactions with Materials3DPH-1Spring93
626Toxicology II3Toxicology 625 or consent of instructorSpring60
699Independent Study1-3Consent of instructorFall & SpringUnlimited
Pharmacy (726)
Fall
630Rural Pharmacy Practice2DPH-3 or consent of instructor (Preference given to students in Rural Health named option)Fall18
Spring
490Introduction to Specialty Pharmacy2DPH-3Spring20
640Appropriate Use of Abused Drugs2DPH-2 or DPH-3Spring150
Pharmacy Practice (728)
Fall
550Fluids and Electrolytes2DPH-3 or consentFall140
610Leadership in Health-System Pharmacy2DPH-3Fall24
611Medical Imaging for Pharmacists2DPH-1Fall32
628Practice Innovations I1DPH-3 (Preference given to students in Rural Health named option)Fall5
670Veterinary Therapeutics1DPH-3Fall & Spring40
671Introduction to Academic Pharmacy I2DPH-3 and consentFall14
677Seminars in Cardiology2DPH-3Fall20
699Independent Study1-3Consent of instructorFall & SpringUnlimited
746Interdisciplinary Care of the Child with Special Health Care Needs3DPH-1Fall & Spring18
Spring
467Interprofessional Collaborative Practice in HIV Care1Consent of instructorSpring6 pharmacy students
468Introduction to Pharmacy Informatics1DPH-1Spring32
490(5)Seminars in Cannabinoids2DPH-1Spring16
490(8)Seminars in Pharmacy Practice1DPH-1Spring38
612Radiopharmaceuticals2Phm Prac 611 or consentSpring32
657Seminars in Pediatric Pharmacotherapy2DPH-3Spring39
659Infectious Disease and Pharmacotherapy in Acute Care1DPH-3 Note: 2x/week for 1/2 of semesterSpring37
668Seminars in Critical Care2Completion of Phm Prac 550Spring24
670Veterinary Therapeutics1DPH-3Fall & Spring45
673Seminars in Global Health Pharmacy1DPH-1Spring18
674Seminars in Interprofessional Mental Health Care2DPH-3Spring24
678Seminars in Oncology1DPH-2 or DPH-3Spring38
679Advanced Diabetes Management2DPH-3Spring12
699Independent Study1-3Consent of instructorFall & SpringUnlimited
746Interdisciplinary Care of the Child with Special Health Care Needs3DPH-1Fall & Spring18
Social and Administrative Pharmacy (732)
Fall
401History of Pharmacy2Junior standingFall60
490Health Equity and Social Justice2Professional student standingFall~8-12 pharmacy students
699Independent Study1-3Consent of instructorFall & SpringUnlimited
699Independent Study1-3Consent of instructorFall & SpringUnlimited

Elective Course Descriptions


Biological Interactions with Materials (PHM SCI 718-430; crosslisted with Biomedical Engineering 430)

Credits: 3

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lecture and lab; professional and graduate students are also evaluated on a group project and presentation based on clinical cases

Prerequisites: 1 year of general biology or two semesters of zoology, and 1 semester of organic chemistry, or consent of the instructor

Course objectives: (1) To understand and to integrate biology and material science and engineering; (2) to apply this integrated knowledge in the design of materials for a specific biomedical application; (3) to develop critical experimental design and data assessment of data related to biological response to materials; (4) to be aware of the clinical utility and limitation of materials for biomedical applications; (5) to have a practical understanding of biomaterial-based laboratory safety and techniques

Course content: Biomaterials are synthetic or biological materials used for the permanent augmentation or replacement of tissues, as well as for applications that require a relative short duration. A wide range of different materials is employed in the construction of biomedical devices, such as artificial blood vessels, mechanical heart valves, breast implants, orthopedic joints, dental filings, and devices such as intravenous catheters and drug delivery vehicles. This course addresses the basic biological systems governing the utilization of biomaterials and the range of materials currently being employed for biomedical applications. Various analytical techniques pertinent to biomaterial research and evaluation will also be discussed. Selected major medical fields in which biomaterials play a critical role will be discussed throughout the course.

Maximum enrollment: Approximately 130

Instructional staff: Randolph Ashton, Biomedical Engineering; Tracy Puccinelli, Biomedical Engineering; and graduate student teaching assistants from the School of Pharmacy’s Pharmaceutical Division and the College of Engineering’s Department Biomedical Engineering

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: biotechnology; research and development; industry-based pharmacists; military pharmacists; pharmacists in non-traditional settings; regulatory pharmacists.

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Toxicology I (PHM SCI 718-625)

Credits: 3

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Lecture

Prerequisites: Biochemistry 50l or PHM SCI 432, and Physiology 335 or consent of instructor

Course objectives: This is a graduate level course open to undergraduate students who are interested in pursuing graduate study in toxicology, pharmacology or an allied profession or who want to obtain a more thorough understanding of toxicology. The objective of this course is to provide a basic understanding of the principles of toxicology, the biochemical mechanisms of toxicity in mammalian species and man, correlations between morphological and functional changes caused by toxicants in different organs of the body, and the techniques for evaluating toxicity.

Course content: Fundamentals of toxicant absorption, tissue distribution, excretion and metabolism; application of pharmacokinetic principles to quantify toxicant accumulation and elimination; analytical methods to study toxicant metabolism; basic information on receptor theory, spare receptors, competitive and noncompetitive antagonists; methods to study receptor binding; and the influence of genetic polymorphisms and mutations on toxicant disposition and action at the whole animal level are presented. Subsequent lectures cover patterns and general mechanisms of cell injury and morphological and biochemical functional alterations in specific cellular structures. A discussion of methods in histological tissue assessment using light, electron and scanning electron microscopy is followed by lectures in hepatotoxicity and renal toxicity. Emphasis is placed on biochemical alterations which initiate the organ toxicity, temporal development of toxicity, and correlation of morphologic alterations with deleterious changes in organ function. Chemical carcinogenesis is covered by presenting trends in cancer mortality and incidence, structural variety and metabolism to reactive electrophiles of chemical carcinogens, the role of genes in controlling responses to toxic agents; tumor initiation and promotion are discussed; and the application of in vitro toxicity tests and their relationship to the in vivo assessment of the toxicity of a substance are presented.

Maximum enrollment: Unlimited

Instructional staff: R. Burnette, R. Moore, R. Peterson, Pharmacy; R. Albrecht, Vet. Sci.; H. Pitot, A. Poland, Oncology; M. Gould, A. Verma, G. Wilding, Human Oncology; A. Elfarra, Vet. School; C. Jefcoate, Pharmacology Med. School; L. Allen-Hoffmann, Pathology

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: Pharmaceutical industry, academia and/or research (pharmacology, toxicology, pathology, oncology), clinical specialties

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Toxicology II (PHM SCI 718-626)

Credits: 3

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lecture

Prerequisites: Toxicology 625 or consent of instructor

Course objectives: This is a graduate level course organized as a continuation of the material begun in Toxicology 625; it is also geared toward graduate and undergraduate students who are interested in pursuing graduate study in toxicology, pharmacology or an allied profession or who want to obtain a more thorough understanding of toxicology. The objectives of this course are to provide the student with a basic understanding of methods and fundamental biochemical mechanisms of toxicity in several mammalian organ systems, in vivo and in vitro methods for assessment of safety and risks of toxicants, and mechanisms of species specificity.

Course content: The course begins with a series of lecture units which present toxicant-induced functional and morphological alterations in mammalian and human organ systems. The specific systems and the fundamental mechanisms of toxicant effects that are covered are the blood and immune systems, the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, the peripheral and central nervous system, and the gastrointestinal system. Central nervous system directed behavioral effects, and reproductive and teratogenesis effects of toxicants are discussed. In addition, factors which should be considered in planning and evaluating experiments, including safety regulations and standards, experi-mental design analysis and decision making factors will be presented. Also, methods of studying the distribution of toxicants throughout the environment, with emphasis on the mechanisms of distribution and chemical alteration of toxic material, will be presented. Finally, fundamentals of the mechanisms of action in nonmammalian species will be presented with emphasis on mechanisms of toxicant specificity.

Maximum enrollment: 60

Instructional staff: P. Bass, J. Robinson, R. Moore, Pharmacy; W. Ershler, G. Odell, Medicine; R. Albrecht, R. Hall, Vet. Sci.; L. Davis, R. Moss, Physiology; B. Olson, Prev. Medicine; N. Laughlin, Ed. Psychology; K. Mackenzie, RMT, Inc.; T. Thackur, M. Weiler, Hazelton Labs; G. Heatley, Ophthalmology; M. Betley, Bacteriology; M. Gould, Human Oncology; C. Marcus, Pharmacol & Toxicol., Purdue University; M. Walker, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: Pharmaceutical industry, academia and/or research (pharmacology, toxicology,pathology, oncology), clinical specialties

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Appropriate Use of Abused Drugs (PHM SCI 726-640)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lecture

Prerequisites: DPH-3 standing, or consent of instructor

Course objectives: To discuss the pharmacology and toxicology of addictive substances, as well as the pathophysiologic implications of the use of these drugs. Pharmacotherapeutic approaches will be presented in depth, as well as the availability of treatment programs in Wisconsin.

Course content: Topics will include:

  1. the pharmacology and toxicology of addictive substances (alcohol and other CNS depressants, narcotics, stimulants, hallucinogens, PCP, marijuana, solvents)
  2. pharmacotherapeutic approaches for alcoholism, opiate addiction, cocaine addiction, nicotine addition
  3. impaired health professionals program
  4. trends of substance abuse in Wisconsin
  5. ethical issues of substance abuse in health care delivery
  6. legalization of abused substances: a harm reduction strategy?

Methods of evaluating student achievement: This course will be graded on an A-F basis; there will be midterm and final exams.

Maximum enrollment: 150

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: Community pharmacy, institutional pharmacy, toxicology, governmental agencies

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Substance Abuse and Chemical Dependency (PHM SCI 726-768)

Credits: 3

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Lecture

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Course objectives: The overall objective of this course is to introduce the student to the basic tools and concepts used in the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and pharmacogenomic characterization of drugs in living systems, using a physiologically based conceptual approach.

Course content: Physiologically based pharmaceutics; pharmacokinetic models; non-compartmental pharmacokinetics; physiological pharmacokinetic models; species scaling; pharmacodynamic models; integration of pharmacogenomics with the previously mentioned topics; use of Berkeley Madonna to develop computer simulations for the above seven topics along with sensitivity analysis, curve fitting and error analysis procedures.

Maximum enrollment: Approximately 25

Instructional staff: R. Burnette, Pharmacy

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: pharmaceutical industry; research and development; academic pharmacist; drug information specialist; critical care pharmacist; industry-based pharmacist; pharmacist in non-traditional setting; veterinary pharmacists.

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Rural Pharmacy Practice (PHM PRAC 728-490)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Active discussion

Prerequisites: DPH-3 status

Course objectives: Discuss and assess the opportunities for pharmacy practice in rural settings, with an emphasis on community assessment, service development, and interprofessional collaboration.

Course content: Rural life, epidemiology of rural areas, rural healthcare delivery, interprofessional care in rural communities, community pharmacy leadership, inpatient pharmacy leadership, ambulatory care pharmacy leadership, underserved populations, healthcare reform, “current events” in rural healthcare topics discussions.

Methods of evaluating student achievement:

Maximum enrollment: 18

Instructional staff: Ed Portillo, PharmD; David Mott, PhD, FAPhA, Rph; John Dopp, PharmD, MS; Robert Breslow, RPh; Kevin Look, PharmD, PhD; Mara Kieser, MS, RPh

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Infectious Disease Pharmacotherapy in the Acute Care Setting (PHM PRAC 728-659)

Credits: 1

Semester offered: First half of spring semester

Course format: Lecture with active discussion

Prerequisites: Completion or concurrent enrollment in Phm Prac 656

Course objectives: Develop knowledge and clinical skills pertaining to drug selection, dosing, and monitoring of antimicrobials used to treat hospitalized patients with serious life-threatening infectious diseases.

Course content: Topics: Pathogen identification beyond cultures; significance of resistance/inpatient-specific antibacterials; antibiotic pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics; combination therapy/synergy; intraabdominal infections; controversies in aminoglycoside/vancomycin pharmacokinetics; febrile neutropenia; endocarditis; catheter-related bloodstream infections; viral hepatitis; nosocomial pneumonia; meningitis; sepsis; systemic fungal infections; modifying anti-HIV regimens; opportunistic infections in AIDS.

Format: Reading assignments (1-3 articles/topic) with instructor-led discussions in class.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: On line quizzes (10)

Maximum enrollment: 40

Instructional staff: Steve Ebert, PharmD, Clinical Specialist, Infectious Diseases, and Clinical Professor, UW School of Pharmacy; Jill Strayer, PharmD, HIV Pharmacist and Clinical Instructor, UW School of Pharmacy

This course will be particularly beneficial for: PharmD students who are interested in practicing pharmaceutical care in a hospital setting, but will also be useful as preparation for 740 and/or 760 rotations in hospitals in the DPM-4 year.

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Seminars in Oncology (PHM PRAC 728-678)

Credits: 1

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lecture with active discussion

Prerequisites: DPH-3 standing

Course objectives: Although the focus of this course is on the care of oncology patients, there is the understanding that pharmacy students taking this elective will not have started the oncology pharmacotherapy topics in the required courses of the PharmD curriculum (728-656). The course therefore presents practical issues surrounding the optimization of medication use in the treatment of cancer patients; these issues are also applicable to other disease states and drugs. The concepts learned in this course are applicable within heath systems, hospitals, and the outpatient, community setting.

Course content: The course will address practical issues surrounding the optimization of medication use in the treatment of cancer patients. Course faculty will share their expertise and practical solutions to the everyday challenges of providing exceptional clinical oncology care in a safe, fiscally responsible manner to optimize clinical outcomes of cancer patients. The course combines lecture and out of class projects. Included topics range across clinical, operational, and practice management issues that affect oncology pharmacy practice. These topics include: pharmacogenomics, cell therapies, oncology research, survivorship, oral chemotherapy management, hazardous drug handling, value of cancer care, specialty pharmacy and REMS processes, and transitions of care. Although focused on oncology patients, the course topics offer practical exposure to issues confronting the care of patients with other types of diseases. Case-based exercises will be incorporated to allow students to apply learned material to real-world applications.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: On line quizzes (10)
In-class quizzes (4 x 10 points): 40%
Individual projects: 20%
Group project: 20%
Final exam: 20%

Maximum enrollment: 150

Instructional staff: Paul Hutson, PharmD- Course Coordinator, Caroline Quinn, PharmD, TA

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Introduction to Pharmacy Informatics (PHM PRAC 728-468)

Credits: 1

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lecture and online discussion

Prerequisites: DPH-1

Course objectives: The objectives of this course are to define the basic terminology used in health informatics, describe the benefits and current constraints in using information and communication technology in healthcare, and identify the reasons for the systemic processing of data, information, and knowledge in healthcare.

Course content: Introduction to Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), Electronic Health Records (EHRs), Personal Health Records (PHRs) and Health Information Exchange (HIE); patient and medication safety in health information technology; pharmacy automation; computerized provider order entry; barcode medication administration; Interoperability; e-prescribing; data management and legal and regulatory aspects of EHRs

Maximum enrollment: 32

Instructional staff: Jack Temple, Carrie DeGowin, Kerry Goldrosen, Julie Pawola, Sara Pivovar, Mike Reed, Dan Ruhland

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Seminars in Cannabinoids (PHM PRAC 728-490[5])

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lecture with active discussion

Prerequisites: DPH-3 or consent of instructor

Course objectives:

  1. Describe the role of the endocannabinoid system in human disease.
  2. Identify appropriate cannabinoid use in various disease states.
  3. Describe the mechanism of action of THC and CBD on several body systems and disease states.
  4. Explain the pharmacology of THC and CBD.
  5. Describe common / serious drug interactions and adverse effects of cannabis therapies and methods for preventing or minimizing their occurrence.
  6. Analyze and present primary and lay literature regarding cannabinoid therapy.

Course content:

  • History
  • Agronomy, phytochemistry, and botany
  • Endocannabinoid system
  • Cannabinoid pharmacology
  • Epilepsy
  • Neurodegeneration and sleep
  • Spasticity
  • Psychiatric indications
  • Risks
  • Pain
  • Cancer
  • Synthetic cannabinoids, vape injury, and abuse

Maximum enrollment: 18

Instructional staff: Luc Richert, PhD; Chris Krueger; Jess Reed, PhD; David Potter, JP, PhD, FRSB, FLS; Hunter Land, MS; Sara Serag, BPharm, MS, PhD; Barry Gidal, PharmD, FAES; Natalie Schmitz, MPA, PharmD, PhD; John Dopp, PharmD, MS; Angela Janis, MD, DFAPA; Paul Hutson, PharmD; Cody Wenthur, PharmD, PhD

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Seminars in Pharmacy Practice (PHM PRAC 728-490[8])

Credits: 1

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Seminar

Prerequisites: DPH-1

Course objectives: Familiarize students to contemporary pharmacy topics and practice advancement efforts pharmacy residents are leading.

Course content: Introduction to types of residencies available post-graduation; conducting research and quality improvement projects as a pharmacy resident; appropriate research and project management skills; current trends in pharmacy practice advancement; evaluation of an academic seminar/lecture.

Maximum enrollment: 38

Instructional staff: Barry Gidal, David Hager

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Seminars in Critical Care (PHM PRAC 728-668)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lectures, small group discussions, case presentations

Prerequisites: Completion of Phm Prac 655 & 550

Course content: The objectives of this course are to: critically review published research so as to apply evidence-based medicine principles to future practice; design a therapeutic regimen consisting of both non-drug and drug therapy that is appropriate for an individual patient based on clinical condition (severity of illness), concomitant diseases and medications.

Course topics include: How to be an ICU pharmacist; pain, agitation, and delirium; PAD; vasopressors/sepsis; sepsis controversies; ventilators; seizures/status epilepticus; reversal of anticoagulation; neurocritical care topics; RSI/ED topics; status asthmaticus/COPD exacerbations; DVT/PE/SUP; AKI/RRT; liver failure/HRS/encephalopathy; antibiotic issues in critical care; toxicology.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: weekly quizzes; seminar attendance; level of participation in small and large group discussions; sepsis controversy and toxicology presentations; final exam.

Special Information: None

Maximum enrollment: 20

Instructional staff: Jeff Fish, Jennifer Garber, Melissa Heim, and Karen Kopacek; guest lecturers

This course will be particularly beneficial for: While this course could be valuable to any pharmacist, it is particularly applicable to anyone considering acute care practice or advanced specialty practice in critical care.

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Indtroduction to Specialty Pharmacy (PHM PRAC 728-490)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lectures, discussions, guest speakers

Prerequisites: DPH-3 standing

Course content: The objectives of this course are to: understand the basics of specialty pharmacy including market trends, contracting, and specialty pharmaceutical reimbursement, understand the impact that specialty pharmacy has on health systems and patient outcomes, gain hands on experience working through managerial topics in specialty pharmacy, understand the basics of how to start a specialty pharmacy program and the associated considerations.

Course topics include: Specialty Pharmacy marketplace, Specialty Pharmacy operations, distribution, and infrastructure, Specialty Pharmacy reimbursement and formulary management, Specialty Pharmacy patient management and outcome reporting, establishing a Specialty Pharmacy and quality and accreditation issues, Specialty Pharmacy pipeline and manufacturers’ perspectives. Methods for evaluating student achievement: Student reflections and quizzes, class attendance.

Special Information: None

Maximum enrollment: 20

Instructional staff: David Mott, Barry Gidal, Andy Pulvermacher, Scott Canfield, guest lecturers.

This course will be particularly beneficial for: This course will be useful for all pharmacists, but will be particularly useful for pharmacists who are interested in Specialty Pharmacy or are considering a residency in Specialty Pharmacy, ambulatory care, or managed care.

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Fluids and Electrolytes (PHM PRAC 728-550)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Lecture

Prerequisites: DPH-3 or consent of instructor

Course objectives: The objectives of this course are to instruct students in: 1. The principles of fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. 2. How to use these principles to evaluate patients for fluid, electrolyte, and nutritional disorders. 3. How to design therapy to prevent and correct the disorders.

Course content: Clinical disorders of water, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorous and acid-base balance are discussed, including brief presentations of example patients. Special considerations in the management of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis, shock, edema, and burns are discussed. There are also general discussions of the hazards of parenteral therapy, and the equipment used for parenteral therapy.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: Open-note exams and problem sets are used to determine the course grade.

Special Information: While this class could be valuable to any pharmacist, it is particularly applicable for anyone considering hospital practice or advanced training in clinical practice (such as residency programs).

Maximum enrollment: Unlimited

Instructional staff: Professor Ron Sorkness

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: Hospital pharmacy, nursing home pharmacy, home infusion therapy, academia and/or research (professional practice teaching [clinical faculty member]), clinical specialties

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Interprofessional Collaborative Practice in HIV Care [PHM PRAC 728-467]

Credits: 1

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Blended learning, including in-person lectures and activities (n=5), online learning sessions (n=6) and clinical observation sessions (n=2)

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Course objectives: Students will participate in the course as part of an interprofessional team of pharmacy, nursing and medical students, and develop an understanding of basic HIV prevention and care principles as well as principles of interprofessional collaborative practice.

Course content: The course will focus on the following areas:

  • The history of the HIV epidemic
  • Current HIV epidemiology, including populations disproportionately impacted by HIV
  • Principles of interprofessional practice and education
  • Basic principles of HIV prevention, diagnosis and treatment
  • HIV care models and the role of interprofessional teams in HIV care

Methods for evaluating student achievement: Student reflections, interprofessional team-based project and presentation

Maximum enrollment: 6 pharmacy students

Instructional staff:

  • Joseph Zorek, PharmD, BCGP, Assistant Professor and Director of Interprofessional Education, UW Madison School of Pharmacy
  • James Sosman, MD, FACP, Professor and Medical Director, UW Health HIV/AIDS Comprehensive Care Program, UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health
  • Paula Jarzemsky, MS, RN, Clinical Professor and Interprofessional Program Director, UW-Madison School of Nursing
  • Guest lecturers

The course will be of value to: pharmacy and other health professions students seeking careers in infectious disease and HIV health care settings

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Medical Imaging for Pharmacists (PHM PRAC 728-611)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Lecture

Prerequisites: DPH-1 standing; other pharmacy students may take this course with the consent of the instructor

Course objectives: Medical Imaging for Pharmacists is a course intended to introduce the concepts of radiation to a practicing pharmacist, as well as provide a basic overview of the use of radiation and the technology available in a Radiology Department. After this class, a practicing pharmacist would have a better understanding of patient experiences in a Radiology exam and would be more equipped to discuss with a patient in a hospital or retail pharmacy what to expect during a radiology procedure, the risks of radiation, possible interactions or events associated with contrast, and the general properties of isotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. This class is a pre-requisite to Radiopharmaceuticals 612, which is a concentrated study of radiopharmaceuticals used in the Nuclear Medicine Department.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: Grading is on an A-F basis (1/3 on take-home problems, 1/3 on midterm exam, and 1/3 on final exam)

Special Information: While this class could be valuable to any pharmacist, it is particularly applicable for anyone considering hospital practice or advanced training in clinical practice (such as residency programs).

Maximum enrollment: 28

Instructional staff: Scott Knishka, Senior Nuclear Pharmacist, UW CSC Dept. of Radiology

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: Hospital pharmacy, pharmaceutical industry, academia and/or research (pharmacology, physiology, biochemistry, and others where radiotracers are used), nuclear pharmacy.

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Radiopharmaceuticals (PHM PRAC 728-612)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lecture

Prerequisites: Phm Prac 611 or consent of instructor

Course objectives: This is a lecture course in which the student will be presented an overview of the theories and mathematics involved. As a result of completing this course the student will:

  1. Have an appreciation for the value of radioactivity and tracer methodology in diagnosis, therapy, and medical research.
  2. Have an understanding of pharmacy’s involvement in nuclear medicine.
  3. Be competent in the basic mathematics of nuclear pharmacy, including radioactive decay calculations, concentration and dose/volume calculations, pediatric dose adjustment calculations.
  4. Be able to describe the chemistry, quality control, pharmacology, indications, and dosage of all commonly used radiopharmaceuticals.
  5. Have a basic understanding of radiation and its biological effects.
  6. Have a basic understanding of the regulatory aspects of nuclear pharmacy.
  7. Be eligible for 300 hours credit toward the 4000 hour experience requirement to sit for the Nuclear Pharmacy Specialty Certification Exam.

Course content: 1) Fundamentals of radiation physics; 2) Radiation methodology; 3) Medical applications of radionuclides; 4) Radiopharmaceuticals; 5) Biological effects of radiation; 6) Regulatory aspects

Methods for evaluating student achievement: Grading is on an A-F basis (1/3 on take-home problems, 1/3 on midterm exam, and 1/3 on final exam)

Special Information: While this class could be valuable to any pharmacist, it is particularly applicable for anyone considering hospital practice or advanced training in clinical practice (such as residency programs).

Maximum enrollment: Unlimited

Instructional staff: Scott Knishka, Senior Nuclear Pharmacist, UW CSC Dept. of Radiology

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: Hospital pharmacy, pharmaceutical industry, academia and/or research (pharmacology, physiology, biochemistry, and others where radiotracers are used), nuclear pharmacy.

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Leadership in Health-System Pharmacy (PHM PRAC 728-610)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Lecture/Seminar

Prerequisites: S&A Pharmacy 411, 414, 511 or consent of the instructor

Course objectives: This course is designed to expose students to personal leadership qualities essential to operate efficiently within an integrated health care delivery system and advance the profession and practice of pharmacy. Students will gain a foundation to become future pharmacy leaders through an understanding of pharmacy’s continual evolution in the changing health care environment.

Course content: The course is taught in a seminar/discussion format. Emphasis will be placed on students applying didactic content to discussion and health system leadership. Interactions with practice leaders who are engaged in these activities will occur weekly.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: No exams or quizzes. 1) Attendance and participation in seminar and online discussion; 2) Practical application of course content through completion one written and oral assignment (e.g. meeting minutes, job description, meeting agenda, topic brief for legislators, interview panel member, meeting facilitator); 3) Writing or presenting a succinct business case for expanded pharmacy services within a health system.

Maximum enrollment: 24

Instructional staff: Dave Hager, Pharmacy Coordinator, UW Health; Steve Rough, Director of Pharmacy, UW Health; and invited guest instructors. The course will be beneficial for PharmD students who are interested in becoming formal or informal leaders for the profession of pharmacy.

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Practice Innovations I (PHM PRAC 728-628)

Credits: 1

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Discussion and independent project management

Prerequisites: DPH-3 status

Course objectives: In the Practice Innovations course, students apply foundational knowledge of project management to hands-on experience planning positive change within the health care system. Students in this course will learn to think strategically to critically assess a problem, identify solutions, and implement change. This course will specifically emphasize rural health practice. Students in this course will be strongly encouraged to enroll in Practice Innovation II, a 1-credit course in the Spring.

Course content: Project management skillset, abstract writing, how to develop an effective poster, developing a project charter, project plan, and communication plan.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: A written assignment, 2 quizzes, and a final examination will be used to determine the grade.

Maximum enrollment: 2

Instructional staff: Ed Portillo, PharmD; David Mott, PhD, FAPhA, Rph; Mara Kieser, MS, RPh

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Seminars in Pediatric Pharmacotherapy (PHM PRAC 728-657)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lecture with active discussion

Prerequisites: Phm Prac 655

Course objectives: Develop knowledge and clinical skills pertaining to drug selection, dosing, and monitoring of drugs used in children, and in obstetrics.

Course Content: Pregnancy and Lactation, Perinatal Complications (Pre-term labor, Preeclampsia, Labor Induction, Obstetrical analgesia), Neonatology (Neonatal infections, Respiratory Distess Syndrome), Developmental Pharmacokinetics, Drug Dosing and Delivery, Pediatric Pain and Analgesia, Cystic Fibrosis Sickle Cell Disease, Management of Diabetes in Children, Fluids & Electrolytes, Leukemias and Lymphomas, Solid Tumors, Infectious Diseases in Children, Poisoning & Poison Prevention, Antidepressants / Antipsychotics / ADHD

Methods for evaluating student achievement: Maximum enrollment: 24

Instructional Staff: Professor Hutson (facilitator), Ann Ebert, PharmD, Roberta Aulie, PharmD, Tom Nelson, PharmD, Brian LaRowe, PharmD, Nikki Lokker, PharmD, Heather Donovan, PharmD, Frederick Kittel, PharmD, David Gummin, MD, Sarah Gdant, PharmD. This course will be of value to pharmacy students who are interested in practicing pharmaceutical care in a pediatric hospital setting. It will also be useful for those anticipating an outpatient practice who desire a deeper understanding of pediatric pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy.

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Veterinary Therapeutics (PHM PRAC 728-670)

Credits: 1

Semester offered: Fall & Spring

Course format: Lecture course and project option

Prerequisites: DPH-3 standing or consent of instructor

Course objectives: 1) To become aware of the roles and functions of veterinary medicine and pharmaceutical technology 2) To understand the role of regulatory medicine and relationships to drug therapy and animal health 3) To understand the functions of drug therapy in the treatment and prevention of disease in commercial, companion, and exotic animal species. 4) To become acquainted with medical-veterinary-social issues and their relationship to drug therapy

Course content: The student will become acquainted with the following issues: the organization and functions of veterinary medicine education and practice, the functions of veterinary dosage forms and methods of drug administration, the role of federal and state agencies, and the roles of drug compounding and drug distribution. Comparative pharmacokinetics and toxicology and their relationship to dose determination are presented. The relationship of zoonoses and human health is discussed. Drug management of ectoparasites and endoparasites is reviewed. Special emphasis is placed upon antibiotic and antifungal therapy veterinary species. The role of feed additives, drug residues, and nutritional therapy is discussed. CNS therapies including anesthesia, pain management, sedation, behavioral management, neurology, and euthanasia methods are presented. The role of vaccines and biologicals in health maintenance is reviewed. Special topics including dermatology, EENT therapy, endocrine and reproductive therapy, cardiology, chemotherapy, GI therapy, and alternative therapies are explored. The human animal bond, minor species, and special roles of animals such as the animal athlete are examined.

Maximum enrollment: 45

Instructional staff: James Budde, PharmD, RPh, Pharmacy Manager, UW Veterinary Care

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in community and institutional pharmacy practice.

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Introduction to Academic Pharmacy I (PHM PRAC 728-671)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Small group discussions; student case presentations

Prerequisites: DPH-3

Course objectives: Introduce and expose DPH-3 students to the role of the pharmacy educator. Specific objectives of this course are to: create and deliver an instructional module or activity; discuss a variety of instructional methodologies and assessment strategies; evaluate and discuss specific journal articles of interest to the student; employ interpersonal and intergroup behaviors effective in various teaching situations.

Course content: Academic misconduct/ethics, teaching strategies, teaching philosophies, discussion of teaching-related topics of interest to and chosen by students within the course. During the first few weeks of the course, faculty members will present seminars on selected teaching topics. For the remainder of the course, student groups will prepare and deliver discussions and journal clubs on teaching-related topics pertaining to the course objectives.

Maximum enrollment: 10 students

Instructional staff: S Barnett (coordinator); C Gallimore, M Pitterle, A Porter, and J Zorek

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: Academic Pharmacy; any pharmacist interested in precepting students (in any setting)

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Seminars in Global Health Pharmacy (PHM PRAC 728-673)

Credits: 1

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: One 50-minute seminar session per week for the entire semester

Prerequisites: No course prerequisites; students must be admitted to the School of Pharmacy

Course objectives: As a result of successfully completing this course, the student will be able to: 1. Understand and interpret the Millennium Development Goals from a health care professional/pharmacist perspective. 2. Understand the Global Pharmacy Practice Standards and compare these standards to actual practice around the world. 3. Identify ways that international organizations are working to improve pharmacy practice and education globally. 4. Compare and contrast issues raised in the classroom from an international and domestic perspective. 5. Identify an important topic related to this course, retrieve appropriate literature, and present a seminar (lecture and discussion) on the topic.

Course content: Medications are vitally important to global health. Yet the appropriate selection, use and distribution of medications are problematic in many regions of the world. The role and contributions of the pharmacist also are underdeveloped in many countries. In this course students will examine issues related to medication accessibility, selection and distribution and will explore the contributions of pharmacists and the pharmacy profession to medication use and safety from a global perspective. During the first few weeks of the course, faculty members will present seminars on selected topics of global health. For the remainder of the course, students will prepare and deliver a seminar on a global health topic related to the course objectives. Students will also prepare a written report summarizing the seminar presentation.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: Students will be graded on a credit/no credit basis. Contributing factors to the student’s grade are attendance, class participation, the quality of the student’s seminar presentation, and the quality of the student’s written report of the seminar presentation.

Maximum enrollment: Minimum of 10 students, maximum of 20

Instructional staff: Professors Connie Kraus and Thomas Thielke

Summary: This course expands School of Pharmacy offerings in our global health program. For many students, this may be an introduction to global health issues and how the pharmacist can become involved at the global level. In addition to gaining content knowledge, students will strengthen their skills in literature retrieval and analysis as well as developing further their skills in public presentation.

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Seminars in Interprofessional Mental Health Care (PHM PRAC 728-674)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Two class hours per week. The first class hour will consist of the traditional lecture format. The second hour will involve active class discussion, student presentations, and small group work.

Prerequisites: Pharm Prac 728-555 Pharmacotherapy I

Course objectives: By the end of the course students will have a greater understanding of drug therapy and the role of the pharmacist in the management of patients with select psychiatric conditions.

Course content: This course addresses the pharmacotherapeutic management of various psychiatric conditions. Each class period a different psychiatric condition will be the focus of lecture and discussion. The course is designed to expand upon and advance the discussion of psychiatric conditions previously covered in Pharm Prac 728-555 Pharmacotherapy I, and to cover brand new topics not previously taught. A special emphasis will be placed on the role of the pharmacist in the care of patients with mental health conditions. Throughout the semester, the course utilizes a mixture of teaching techniques including lecture, case development and discussion, small group work, and student presentation.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: Students will be evaluated and grades will be assigned based on completion and quality of course work, and in-class participation. Course work will include pre-class readings, small group presentations and projects, patient case development, and a written clinical inquiry in the area of psychiatric pharmacy.

Maximum enrollment: 20 students

Instructional staff: Casey Gallimore, PharmD, Clinical Assistant Professor

Summary: Seminars in Psychiatry is a 2-credit elective course focused on the drug therapy management of psychiatric conditions. A variety of teaching techniques including lecture, case development and discussion, small group work, and student presentation will be utilized to enhance student knowledge and understanding in the area of psychiatric pharmacy.

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Seminars in Cardiology (PHM PRAC 728-677)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Lectures; small group discussions; case presentations

Prerequisites: Completion of Phm Prac 556

Course objectives: The objectives of this course are to: critically review published research so as to apply evidence-based medicine principles to future practice; describe clinical applications of patient care from the perspective of other disciplines; design a therapeutic regimen consisting of both drug and non-drug therapy that is appropriate for an individual patient based on clinical condition (severity of illness), concomitant diseases, and medications; and explain disease processes, pharmacotherapy decisions, and other information relevant to patient education.

Course content: Lipid management, metabolic syndrome, peripheral arterial disease, arrhythmias, heart failure, medical devices for hemodynamic monitoring and cardiac support, heart transplantation, acute coronary syndrome, sudden cardiac arrest, cardiogenic shock, stroke, endocarditis, and advanced cardiac life support.

Methods of evaluating student achievement: No exams; weekly quizzes; seminar attendance; level of participation in small and large group discussions; reflection papers, written journal article analysis, and written patient case evaluations; verbal patient case, journal club, and cardiac disease presentations; written drug monograph and presentation; and one professional conference attendance will be evaluated by the instructor.

Maximum enrollment: Limited to 20 students

Instructional staff: Professors Orly Vardeny and Karen Kopacek; guest lecturers

Special information: While this course could be valuable to any pharmacist, it is particularly applicable to anyone considering acute care practice or advanced specialty practice in cardiology and critical care.

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Advanced Diabetes Management (PHM PRAC 728-679)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Lecture/Seminar/Online

Prerequisites: DPH-3 standing or consent of instructor

Course objectives: This course is designed to provide learners with enhanced education on diabetes topics in an interprofessional environment. Emphasis is placed on current approaches to the medical management of patients with diabetes as well as the role of health team members in diabetes education and coaching/case management.

Course content: The course is taught using the following formats: seminar/discussion, workshop, and on-line learning modules, School of Nursing simulation lab, and real-life immersion experiences. Discussion and interactive activities will be based on readings, assignments, and experiences. Emphasis will be on integrating didactic information/knowledge and applying it to practice and case situations.

Topics will include: insulin delivery and other diabetes devices; medical nutrition therapy; exercise therapy; special populations (children, adolescents, preconception and pregnancy, older adults); diabetes education. Invited experts may facilitate discussion on select topics.

Methods for evaluating student achievement:

  • Attendance and participation in class discussion (including pre-class preparation)
  • Completion of online learning modules and question sets
  • Summarization of topics in reflective journal format
  • Group participation in simulation lab
  • Real-world immersion experiences and in-class reports

Maximum enrollment: 16 (12 pharmacy + 4 nursing)

Instructional staff: Professor Denise Walbrandt Pigarelli and Professor Sarah Kruger

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: Clinical ambulatory care pharmacy, pharmacy practice or community pharmacy residencies, long-term care pharmacy clinical specialties

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Interdisciplinary Care – Child / Chronic Illness (PHM PRAC 728-746)

Credits: 3

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Online

Prerequisites: DPH-1 standing

Course objectives: This is an interdisciplinary course, offered through the Pediatric Pulmonary Center, which integrates knowledge from medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition, regional services, respiratory therapy, and pharmacy. Emphasis is placed on critical transition points in the care of children with chronic lung disease and their families which also can be applied to other populations of children with chronic illness.

Course content: Course topics include: provision of education to patients with chronic lung diseases; interdisciplinary team functioning; issues regarding use of medications in children with chronic lung disease; respiratory therapy services and equipment; pathophysiology of chronic lung disease; nutritional support; nursing and social work support; home care issues; community, state, and national resources available to the child and public policy issues and advocacy.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: Participation in class activities; observation visits to two interdisciplinary health team conferences with written report; interdisciplinary group analysis, class presentation, and written report on a case involving complex care of a child with a chronic lung condition.

Maximum enrollment: 15 (Maximum of 5 Pharmacy students)

Instructional staff: Becki Tribby (K6/233 Clinical Sciences Center)

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in: Institutional pharmacy, community pharmacy, clinical specialties (including pediatrics).

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History of Pharmacy (S&A PHM 732-401)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Spring

Course format: Traditional lectures with substantial supporting readings

Prerequisites: Junior standing, or consent of the instructor

Course description: This course explores pharmacy’s past, beginning in pre-historical times up to the start of the 21st century. Presented in a chronological flow, the course will emphasize the development of medicines and the origins and growth of the pharmacy profession. About half of the course will concentrate on the history of pharmacy in the USA.

Course topics: Role of drugs and medicines in ancient civilizations; the appearance of professional pharmacy in the Middle Ages; the place of pharmacy in Renaissance Europe; contrast of pharmacy in Continental Europe versus Britain in early modern period; the drug trade in colonial America; changing theories of drug action; the beginnings of large-scale medicine manufacturing; pharmacy in Revolutionary War and War of 1812; establishment of the first associations and schools of pharmacy; the founding and growth of APhA; the soda fountain era in community pharmacy; the incomplete adoption of the new professionalism by pharmacists; 20th-century reforms of pharmacy education; World War Two and pharmacy; influence of science on pharmacy and pharmaceutical industry; count and pour era of practice; the introduction of clinical pharmacy; the HMO Act and managed care; the adoption of the single PharmD degree; the call for pharmaceutical care; workforce shortages and salary inflation; MTM; the future of pharmacy from one historian’s point of view.

Methods for evaluating student achievement: Midterm and final exams plus two short writing assignments

Maximum enrollment: 80

Instructional staff: Professor Higby

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking a broader understanding of the societal role of pharmacists. It will also deepen their appreciation of the professional underpinnings of pharmacy.

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Health Equity and Social Justice (S&A PHM 732-490)

Credits: 2

Semester offered: Fall

Course format: Seminar/Discussion

Prerequisites: Must be a health sciences student

Course objectives:

  • Increased knowledge of social identities and cultural differences of self and others
  • Increased intercultural competencies in personal and professional environments
  • Skills in critical thinking and interpersonal communication
  • Knowledge and skills to engage others in dialogue and discussion around identity and inclusive learning in different spheres of influence
  • An understanding of the health disparities that exist between different social identities, such as race, socioeconomic status, age, etc.
  • An understanding of how social identity impacts understanding of the healthcare system, access to healthcare, patient/healthcare practitioner interactions, and patient care.

Methods for evaluating student achievement:

  • Participation and attendance
  • Completion of readings
  • Reading and practice reflections
  • Journal assignments

Special Information: While this course is valuable to any healthcare practitioner, it is particularly applicable for anyone interested in pursuing practice areas focused on health equity and serving underserved patient populations.

Maximum enrollment: 25 students across the health sciences

Instructional staff: Richard Baker, Natasha Crooks, Lisa Imhoff, Paula Inzeo, Raymond Neal, Alisa Pykett, Karin Silet, Yolanda Tolson

This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in any practice area.

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